What is 1080P Full HDTV?

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What is 1080P Full HDTV and its benefits?
As if the whole idea of HDTV is not confusing enough, tech fans and enthusiasts are raving about 1080P Full HDTV. What is this 1080P Full HDTV everybody is gushing about? Is it as revolutionary as everyone is claiming it to be? People who want to buy HDTVs are getting confused. This articles hopes to shed some light with the confusion on 1080P Full HDTV.

What is 1080P Full HDTV?

The name 1080P Full HDTV 1080p comes from a category of display resolutions. The number “1080″ stands for 1,080 lines of vertical resolution (1080 horizontal scan lines), while the letter p stands for progressive scan. 1080p can be referred to as full HD or full high definition, assuming widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9. It is also used to describe video equipment capabilities. To understand it better these concepts, let us clarify the three components of Full HD 1080p: progressive scanning, lines of resolution and frame rate.

  • In a progressive scanned picture, such as on a 1080P Full HDTV, even- and odd-numbered line fields in an image line are flashed as a single frame every 30th of a second. That means that a progressive scanned picture does not flicker that can be seen on interlaced images, such as images on analog television sets. This creates pictures that are smoother, with less jagged edges and lines.
  • A 1080p HDTV set has 1,920 pixels in each of the 1,080 lines. One advantage of these two million-plus pixels is how close you can sit to your 1080p HDTV. That means that details of pictures displayed in an analog TV are jaggier and smudgier compared to a 1080p HDTV’s clearer and more detailed pictures.

Is a 1080p HD TV really worth buying? What are its benefits?

A 1080p HD TV is worth buying if you are obsessed with picture quality. With the current trend of bigger TV sizes, a 1080p can fill a larger screen with sharper, high quality HD image. 720p HD TVs are still technically high definition, but the images produced are no as sharp when being shown on a massive display compared to the same image shown on the same-sized 1080p HD TV.
Images shown in a 1080p High Definition TV doesn’t have defects like jagged or ‘feathered’ edges that are found in analog sets, which interlaces images. If a viewer sits closer to a large a 1080p HD TV screen, these defects are not present, but are obvious with units that have lower resolution lines.
Most new Blu-ray and HD DVD players already include a 1080p output option. As the normal DVD format is due to be obsolete in time (sooner than later), having a 1080p HDTV unit would make perfect sense, as you will have the pleasure of seeing movies in the highest resolution already.
It is inevitable that HDTV broadcasts on TV will adopt the 1080p format in the near future. The latest HDMI socket available (version 1.3) connecting high definition equipment is already capable of presenting 1,440 lines in progressive scan. Eventually, formats such as 720p will be rendered outdated in no time.

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